NOVEMBER ARTIST 2010

JUSTIN BALMAIN

BORN 1976 AUSTRALIA

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SuperKaleidoscope presents emerging Australian artist Justin Balmain

Influenced by pop culture and in particular the social mores of sub-cultures punk, disco and anarchy, Justin Balmain’s work engages in a dialogue concerning the role of image-making today. Balmain’s investigation into the nature, value and function of the image and our experience of it within our image-saturated environment denotes the influence of modern technologies and the social impact they propagate. His work also offers a duality of contrast and contradiction; for example on beauty and danger, proposing that without knowing one you cannot possibly recognise the other.

Justin Balmain has exhibited throughout Australia including MOP Projects and Chalk Horse Gallery in Sydney. Beginning his candidature at 
Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin, New Zealand, he is currently completing his Master of Fine Arts by Research at the College of Fine Arts, Sydney.


SuperKaleidoscope is pleased to present A Room for Emma Goldman by Australian artist Justin Balmain.

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A Room for Emma Goldman. Text by Justin Balmain.

Within a room, there exists a world, the potential for a world larger than the wall delineating space, and the language that gives definition toward an understanding of what we know a room to be. For a child, a room is undoubtedly a world, full of wonder, possibility, and no end. A Room for Emma Goldman can then be seen as a room for a child; a room that is understood as much more than a room, and visual arrestation is much more than that which is purely seen.

A visual of beauty and the sublime always functions best when there is an inherent contradiction between what one is seeing (thinking/believing they are seeing), and what the reality of that vision in actual fact is. The unknown cannot possibly be the unknown if there is an acknowledgement that here exists something I do not know. The unknown becomes a leap of faith between what one wishes to uncover and experience beyond the visual parameters of their own vision, attaining a physiological reconciliation within that environment which adheres to cognitive reasoning. In this interstice the contradiction exists closest to tangibility.

This is the place that A Room for Emma Goldman best exists as a visual experience, structured on a philosophical ideal that gives articulation to imagery within the space. In this form, imagery is dangerous, or, the vehicle that gives form to visual expression arises from the sensibility of destruction and democratic political purpose. Beauty and danger serve best when functioning symbiotically.

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Justin Balmain A Room for Emma Goldman, 2010.

Digital projection, laptop, iTunes application visualizer, audio, headphones, beanbags, framed inkjet print, books, plinth, glass of water. 

© Images courtesy of the artist.

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Justin Balmain currently lives in Sydney and lectures in painting at the National Art School.

For Justin Balmain's website please click here >>




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